Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What is a “Retainer”?
What is a “Flat Fee”?
How much will my matter cost?
What is a Fee Agreement?
Is there a fee for a consultation?
Can I recoup my attorney’s fees?

What is a “Retainer”?

There are two different types of retainer agreement. A Classic or General Retainer is a fee that’s earned upon receipt. It is used to secure the lawyer’s availability in the future. It is also used to decline retention by any other party who you’re likely to oppose. Under a Classic Retainer, future services will be under a separate engagement agreement with additional fees.

A Special Retainer is a specified fee in exchange for specified services. This type of retainer is an advance on fees. When services provided exceed the advance, additional monies become due from the client. Any unearned fees will be returned to the client.
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What is a “Flat Fee”?

A Flat Fee or Fixed Fee is earned in full when your lawyer agrees to provide whatever services are specified in the fee agreement and/or engagement letter. If you ever decide to stop the representation, you’re entitled to reimbursement, less the amount earned for services already rendered.
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How much will my matter cost?

Our representation could last several months or, in some cases, more than a year. We’ll work with you to try and forecast legal fees and to design a manageable fee agreement.
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What is a Fee Agreement?

Your fee agreement will spell out the scope of services we commit to provide and the method of billing and payment. Additionally, the agreement will specify at what point the fee structure can be expected to change and how it might change.
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Is there a fee for a consultation?

We do not typically charge for an initial phone consultation, though nearly every matter requires an in-person consultation. We charge a $200 fee for the initial face-to-face consultation and intake interview.
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Can I recoup my attorney’s fees?

Ohio courts don’t generally allow a prevailing civil litigant to recover attorney fees from the adverse party. However, if a contract or negotiable instrument provides for attorney fees, Ohio sometimes recognizes an exception. Please note, in some cases Ohio law prohibits or limits these kinds of attorney fee-shifting clauses.

Statutory exceptions sometimes also allow for the recovery of attorney fees. The Ohio Consumer Sales Practices Act is an example, which allows a prevailing party to recover attorney fees.
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Contact Us
For more information, contact us at 614-558-0125 or use our Web Contact Form to arrange an appointment.